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Listen to the Mockingbird (tab with parts for 3 ukes & 5 practice MP3s)

$5.00

Description

This product includes an arrangement for 3 ukuleles each with a different part. Part 1 is the melody and Parts 2 & 3 are harmonies.

The product includes 5 MP3 files.

  • one midi generated practice file for each of the 3 parts
  • one recording of Steven Strauss playing each part but mixed so you can hear how it is supposed to sound when you all play together
  • one recording of Steven Strauss playing the melody and strumming so you can hear how a solo player would sound.

“Listen to the Mocking Bird” (1855) is an American popular song of the mid-19th century. Its lyrics were composed by Septimus Winner under the pseudonym “Alice Hawthorne”, and its music was by Richard Milburn.[1][2][3]

It relates the story of a singer dreaming of his sweetheart, now dead and buried, and a mockingbird, whose song the couple once enjoyed, now singing over her grave. However, the melody is moderately lively.

“Listen to the Mocking Bird” was one of the most popular ballads of the era and sold more than twenty million copies of sheet music.[4] It was popular during the American Civil War and was used as marching music. Abraham Lincoln was especially fond of it, saying, “It is as sincere as the laughter of a little girl at play.”[5]

Some of the earliest popular recordings were by John Yorke AtLee (1891); Joe Belmont (1899); Frank Stanley and Corinne Morgan (1904); and Alma Gluck (1915).[6]

 

 

 

 

Lyrics

“Listen To The Mockingbird” Lyrics

I’m dreaming now of Hallie, sweet Hallie, sweet Hallie
I’m dreaming now of Hallie, for the thought of her is one that never dies
She’s sleeping in the valley, the valley, the valley
She’s sleeping in the valley, and the mockingbird shinging where she lies

Listen to the mockingbird, listen to the mockingbird
The mockingbird is singing o’er her grave
Listen to the mockingbird, listen to the mockingbird
Still singing where the weeping willows wave

Ah well I yet can remember, I remember, I remember
Ah well I yet can remember, when we gathered in the cotton side by side
‘Twas in the mild mid-September, in September, in September
‘Twas in the mild mid-September, and the mockingbird was singing far and wide

* Refrain

When charms of spring are awaken, are awaken, are awaken
When charms of spring are awaken and the mockingbird is singing on the bough
I feel like one so forsaken, so forsaken, so forsaken
I feel like one so forsaken, since my Hallie is no longer with me now

* Refrain

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"Listen to the Mocking Bird" (1855) is an American popular song of the mid-19th century. Its lyrics were composed by Septimus Winner under the pseudonym "Alice Hawthorne", and its music was by Richard Milburn.[1][2][3]

It relates the story of a singer dreaming of his sweetheart, now dead and buried, and a mockingbird, whose song the couple once enjoyed, now singing over her grave. However, the melody is moderately lively.

"Listen to the Mocking Bird" was one of the most popular ballads of the era and sold more than twenty million copies of sheet music.[4] It was popular during the American Civil War and was used as marching music. Abraham Lincoln was especially fond of it, saying, "It is as sincere as the laughter of a little girl at play."[5]

Some of the earliest popular recordings were by John Yorke AtLee (1891); Joe Belmont (1899); Frank Stanley and Corinne Morgan (1904); and Alma Gluck (1915).[6]

https://dmr.bsu.edu/digital/collection/ShtMus/id/836

-- see full Wikipedia article

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